HTLC Network | Uae
HTLC Network is a valuable support that can help you to transform the challenges of an international relocation into a successful and satisfying life experience. We provide global corporate and private relocation and immigration services and we are present in many different parts of the world, being able to meet your requests, to ensure the utmost attention to every detail
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WELCOME TO UAE

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) consists of the seven small emirates of Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Ras Al-Khaimah, Ajman, Umm Al-Qaiwain, and Fujairah, which were united as a federal state on 2 December 1971.

Map_of_the_United_Arab_EmiratesLand:

The UAE covers 32,278 square miles (83,600 square kilometers) and is located on the Arabian (Persian) Gulf. It shares land borders with Oman, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. The seven emirates vary greatly in size. Abu Dhabi represents 85 percent of the land, and the smallest emirate is Ajman. Each emirate is named after its capital city, and Abu Dhabi City is the permanent capital of the nation. The inland area is mostly desert with a few oases, and the barren Hajar Mountains run through the country.

 

Before 1971 the seven emirates were collectively known as the Trucial States, a name that originated from maritime agreements between the British and the leading sheikhs of the tribes inhabiting the southern coast between Qatar and Oman in the first half of the nineteenth century. The economic life of the UAE depended heavily on pearl diving and sea trade in the Gulf and the Indian Ocean. This led to the settlement of different ethnic groups from countries along the trade routes, such as Iran and India. Trade activities with east Africa led to the importation of Africans as laborers in the pearling industry in the late nineteenth century. The African and Iranian ethnic populations have been fully integrated as citizens.

 

People:

Relative to its size and oil wealth, the UAE has a small population, estimated at 2,624,000 in 1997. Before 1970, the local population was tiny (estimated at eighty-six thousand in 1961) and lacked most of the technical skills needed for a modern society. The commercial production of oil triggered rapid population growth as a result of an increase in the national population from improvements in diet, health care, and living standards and the importation on a large scale of mostly male foreign laborers.

 

Language:

The official language is Arabic. Among the immigrant population, English, Hindi, Urdu, Farsi, and Filipino are spoken. English is the language of commerce.

 

Economy:

Income is among the highest in the world, but there are large differences between the emirates, with Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Sharjah producing the most oil. The other emirates have benefitted from oil wealth through the federal welfare system and employment in state institutions. With declining oil prices, the government has attempted to diversify the national economy. This has led to the growth of industry, construction, commerce, free trade zones, transportation, tourism, farming, fisheries, and communications. The rapid development of these sectors has reduced the nation’s dependence on oil. In 1998, the gross domestic product was estimated at $45,590 million, 70 percent from the nonoil sector.

 

The UAE is the third largest exporter of crude oil and gas in the Gulf. It is a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

 

Climate:

The climate of the UAE generally is hot and dry. The hottest months are July and August, when average maximum temperatures reach above 48° C on the coastal plain. In the Al Hajar al Gharbi Mountains, temperatures are considerably cooler, a result of increased altitude. Average minimum temperatures in January and February are between 10° C and 14° C. During the late summer months, a humid southeastern wind known as the sharqi makes the coastal region especially unpleasant. The average annual rainfall in the coastal area is fewer than 120 millimeters, but in some mountainous areas annual rainfall often reaches 350 millimeters. Rain in the coastal region falls in short, torrential bursts during the summer months, sometimes resulting in floods in ordinarily dry wadi beds. The region is prone to occasional, violent dust storms, which can severely reduce visibility.

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) occupies an area of 83,600 sq km along the south-eastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies to the west, Saudi Arabia to the south and west, and Oman to the north and east. The capital and the largest city of the federation, Abu Dhabi, is located in the emirate of the same name.

 

Four-fifths of the UAE is desert, yet it is a country of contrasting landscapes, from awe-inspiring dunes to rich oases, precipitous rocky mountains to fertile plains.

 

uae2

Abu Dhabi lies on a T-shaped island jutting into the Persian Gulf from the central western coast and is the capital and the second largest city of the United Arab Emirates in terms of population and the largest of the seven member emirates of the United Arab Emirates.
Abu Dhabi houses offices of the federal government, and is the seat for the United Arab Emirates Government and the home for the Abu Dhabi Emiri Family and the President of the UAE from this family. Abu Dhabi has grown to be a cosmopolitan metropolis. Its rapid development and urbanization, coupled with the relatively high average income of its population, has transformed Abu Dhabi to a larger and advanced metropolis. Today the city is the country’s center of political, industrial activities, and a major cultural, and commercial centre due to its position as the capital. Abu Dhabi alone generated 56.7% of the GDP of the United Arab Emirates in 2008.

 

Abu Dhabi is home to important financial institutions such as the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange, the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates and the corporate headquarters of many companies and numerous multinational corporations. One of the world’s largest producers of oil, Abu Dhabi has actively attempted to diversify its economy in recent years through investments in financial services and tourism.

 

Main expatriate destination cities:

 

Abu Dhabi

With a population of just under 1.5 million, Abu Dhabi is the headquarters of numerous oil companies and embassies. With only 420,000 citizens in the entire emirate, each has an average net worth of $17 million. The city features large gardens and parks, green boulevards lining all the streets and roads, sophisticated high-rise buildings, international luxury hotel chains and opulent shopping malls.

 

The city has started to change radically in 2004 after the long-ruler Sheikh Zayed passed away and his son Sheikh Khalifa took over. In a bid to attract tourism and investment, land sales to foreigners were allowed and restrictions on alcohol were loosened.

 

Dubai

Is a city in the United Arab Emirates, located within the emirate. The emirate of Dubai is located on the southeast coast of the dubaiPersian Gulf and is one of the seven emirates that make up the country. It has the largest population in the UAE (2,106,177) and the second-largest land territory by area (4,114 km2) after Abu Dhabi, the national capital. Dubai and Abu Dhabi are the only two emirates to have veto power over critical matters of national importance in the country’s legislature. The city of Dubai is located on the emirate’s northern coastline and heads up the Dubai-Sharjah-Ajman metropolitan area. Dubai is nowadays often misperceived as a country or city-state and, in some cases, the UAE as a whole has been described as ‘Dubai’

 

Main foreign investors:

Since the establishment of the United Arab Emirates in 2 December 1971, UAE adopted a balanced foreign policy based on adoption of dialogue, respect of international conventions, commitment to the United Nations Charter and non-interference of other country’s internal affairs, and the settlement of disputes by peaceful means.

 

One of the main anchors of the UAE’s foreign policy has been building cooperation-based relations with all countries of the world. The UAE is the third largest exporter of crude oil and gas in the Gulf and a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

 

More than US$10 billion (Dh36.73bn) in foreign investment poured into the UAE last year, making it the leading destination for the number of foreign direct investment (FDI) projects in the Middle East and Africa.

 

A total of 328 projects were launched, up 13 per cent from the previous year, data from FDI Intelligence shows. The rise comes despite a muted year globally for FDI as jitters about the euro zone, the United States and unrest in the Arab world knocked investor sentiment.

 

dubai2Expatriate living:

The UAE has a very significant expat community, which makes up for almost 50% of the total population. Of the people living in the UAE a vast majority (95%) are Muslim. The majority of expats are drawn here as a result of the tax-free lifestyle on offer and for those on an international wage the standard of living is very high. Private education facilities, fantastic shopping and numerous entertainment options make this an interesting and enjoyable place in which to raise your family.

 

One of the biggest benefits to expatriates of living in Dubai is the low taxation and this has a positive impact on the cost of a number of items, including vehicles, electronic goods and local produce. Utilities are also slightly cheaper here than they are in many countries as a result of government subsidies on electricity, water and gas.

 

As with many cities, accommodation will represent the biggest cost that expatriates face but, according to Mercer, accommodation costs in the region are decreasing: “The trend of falling accommodation costs continues across the Middle East region, driving the cities down the ranking along with the cost of living for expats. Dubai in particular is witnessing a drastic reduction in accommodation costs as the supply of property keeps flooding the rental market.”

 

Expatriates living in the UAE who search out luxury goods or international brand names will also need to be prepared to pay higher prices for those items.

 

emiratiCultural Awareness:

Good manners and courtesy are prized attributes. Always arrive on time for a meeting, however, know that punctuality is not considered a virtue in the Arab world, and people are often kept waiting before, or during, a meeting. Be patient, and do not take it as a lack of respect.

 

Greet the most senior person first when meeting a group of people. You will always be offered refreshments in an Arab home or office. Frequently, this will be Western-style tea or coffee. However, people serve a sweet, milkless tea or a light Arabic coffee flavored with cardamom. You should accept at least one cupful, as it may be considered discourteous to refuse.

 

Take the time to chat and drink the coffee, tea or soft drink and use it as an opportunity to establish relationships.

 

Do not be concerned if your meeting is interrupted by other guests or telephone conversations. The upfront, hard-hitting approach is generally not welcome, so once again, be patient. Be aware that what may seem like evasiveness on the part of your host is usually an unwillingness to say no to your face.

 

Nevertheless, once a deal is made, orally or otherwise, an Arab businessperson’s word is his or her bond and you are also expected to perform accordingly, even if the agreement is a verbal one only.

 

Hospitality is a way of life in the Arab world and business is frequently conducted over lunch or dinner – more than likely in a hotel or restaurant. It is considered polite to return the invitation.

 

Dress conservatively: men should wear a suit, women should ensure that business clothing covers arms and legs. Avoid scheduling meetings during prayer times or major Muslim holidays.

 

Leisure activities and opportunities:

 

Golf

The UAE offers some of the best and most luxurious golfing in the world. The Emirates Golf Club in Dubai offers two championship golf courses, extensive recreational facilities and fine dining. In addition, there is the centrally located Dubai Creek Golf & Yacht Club and the Nad Al Shiba Golf & Racing Club, both with extensive and luxurious facilities. Abu Dhabi Golf Club has two 18-hole courses and the largest driving range in the Gulf, along with an array of recreational facilities open to the public. The newer and more central Abu Dhabi Golf & Equestrian Club includes horse racing and a children’s riding club in addition to its 6453 yard golf course

 

Water Sports

Boats, jet-skis and water-skiing equipment are available for hire. Sailing and windsurfing are popular around Dubai and boats are available for hire.Scuba diving is remarkably good off the coasts of Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Fujairah. Fujairah’s Snoopy Rock is renowned for its friendly population of blacktip reef sharks and turtles. It’s a good spot for snorkelling too. There are numerous dive centres in the coastal areas. An extensive range of equipment is available for hire and purchase at reasonable prices.

 

Swimming is enjoyable from November to May when the sea is a pleasant temperature. During the long hot summer, the waters of the Persian Gulf heat up to a non-refreshing 35ºC. All up-market hotels provide swimming pools, some with water slides.

wadi

Wild Wadi Water Park is an outdoor water park in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Situated in the area of Jumeirah, next to the Burj Al Arab and the Jumeirah Beach Hotel, the water park is operated by Jumeirah International, a Dubai-based hotelier.

 

Wild Wadi has a heated/cooled wave pool, multiple water slides and two artificial surfing machines. In addition, the park had the largest water slide outside of North America, but recently it was removed to make space for two other rides . Another feature of the park is an 18 m (59 ft) waterfall that goes off every ten minutes. The water park also has two gift shops, three restaurants and two snack stands.

 

It was featured in The Amazing Race 5 and The Amazing race Asia 1, in which teams had to slide down a 21 m (69 ft) drop. It was later featured in The Amazing Race Australia 2, but instead, the teams had to ride the Surf Machine and use boogie boards to surf their way to the end where they will get their next clue.

 

Skiing

Skiing in the desert? Only in Dubai! Ski Dubai is an enclosed ski area with 22,500 square metres of real snow year round. There are five runs that vary in difficulty, from gentle beginner slopes to the world’s first indoor black run. Snowboarders can also practice their stunts on the 90-metre long quarter pipe. Ski Dubai provides ski clothing and equipment rental, themed restaurants, party rooms, Snow Pro shop with expert staff offering advice and lessons and a huge interactive Snow Park for kids and parents, which at 3000 square meters is the largest indoor snow park in the world.

Prepare and Plan Visit
In this initial contact the Relocation Coordinator will brief the Transferee, introducing destination services commissioned, and provide access codes to HTLC Network on-line City-Specific Resource Guides. In addition, the Relocation Coordinator will help the Transferee assess personal and family’s housing needs, as well as their hopes and plans for the sojourn in your new destination. The Transferee will be asked to fill out a Personal Needs Analysis Form, which will enable customized service delivery. After gaining a sense of the Transferee’s needs, the Relocation Coordinator will arrange appointments with schools and real estate agents, an appointment will be set up with one of the Local Counsellors for a city briefing and a programme will be finalised for accompanied property and school viewings.

 

Airport Pickup and Greeting The Transferee and family will be met at the airport by a Local Counsellor and accompanied to designated hotel.

 

Destination Country and City Information
The Transferee will be given a briefing on the local city and life in your new destination in general, and will be encouraged to ask any questions. An Information Pack on the destination city will be provided. This Pack includes an information sheet with the HTLC Network office and Local Counsellor contact information and emergency telephone numbers. Further, it includes a city and transport map as well as a hard copy of HTLC Network own City-Specific Resource Guide, which contains a wealth of information such as telephone access codes, English-speaking doctors and expatriate clubs. When available, a copy of the English Yellow Pages, local English language periodicals and other relevant information will also be included in the Information Pack.

 

auto-europe-driving-informationCity by Zone Tour
The purpose of this tour is to familiarise the Transferee with selected areas of the city and type of housing and amenities available, in order to be better prepared to select the neighbourhood most suitable for personal and family needs. The City By Zone Tour is often delivered in conjunction with a house hunting programme.

 

International Schooling The Transferee will be briefed on educational opportunities in the area. The Relocation Coordinator will schedule appointments at the selected schools, and the Local Counsellor will accompany the Transferee to pre-arranged appointments although the appointments will be privately held between the Transferee and school administrators. Where possible, the Relocation Coordinator will organise enrolment procedure and arrange for company invoicing.

 

Full-Day Househunting Programme Following an in-depth briefing by the Relocation Coordinator a programme of property viewings will be arranged. The Local Counsellor will accompany the Transferee to pre-arranged viewings of up to eight properties.

 

Two-Day Househunting Programme Following an in-depth briefing by the Relocation Coordinator a programme of property viewings will be arranged. The Local Counsellor will accompany the Transferee to pre-arranged viewings of up to fifteen properties.

 

Lease Negotiation After the Transferee has selected a property, the Relocation Coordinator will negotiate lease conditions with the real estate agency or landlord according to The national destination law. HTLC Network coordinator will prepare a contract that ensures legal protection for the client. Particular attention is given to include a break clause, as international assignments often change in duration and the aim is to give maximum flexibility within the limits of the national destination law.

 

bigstock-Real-Estate-Home-Inspection-Re-20778977Property Inspection and Inventory Once the lease has been signed, a thorough property inspection is taken in the presence of the Transferee. This includes an inventory of any furnishings, general condition of the property, and meter readings for utility contracts.

 

Utility Connections, Phone Line and Bank Account The Relocation Coordinator will arrange all utility and telephone connections, and a Local Counsellor will accompany the Transferee to open a bank account in the selected area.

 

Settling-In Assistance The Local Counsellor will spend time with the Transferee and family, assisting with requested elements of the relocation process, such as arranging language training, obtaining a satellite decoder or internet service provider, shopping for furniture or securing house contents insurance. Duration of this service depends on various company authorizations.

 

Car Purchase or Lease The Relocation Coordinator will brief the Transferee on the logistics of making an automobile purchase and will research reputable dealers in the area. The Local Counsellor will accompany the Transferee to dealers and act as a translator. Once the Transferee has made the selection, HTLC Network will take care of necessary documentation including insurance cover. For long-term rental HTLC Network will advise local availability of this service.

 

Local Registration
If the Transferee requests, and is eligible, the Local Counsellor will assist with National Health Registration. City hall registration is a separate service and if authorizied, HTLC Network will assist with the whole bureaucratic procedure at the relative cityhall.

 

Closeup of a call center employee with headset at workplaceOngoing Phone Support The HTLC Network support Helpline is available to all Transferees for 90 days from date of property contract signing. Extensions to this Helpline can be added in periods of three months.

 

Car Importation Importation of car to your new destination, including full document assistance and re-registration with Vehicle registry.

 

Full Assignment Tracking Full tracking of all deadlines throughout duration of the Transferees international assignment, notification given of all scheduled renewal dates, such as housing contracts, Permit of Stay and Work Permits. Ad Hoc Services Service rendered both from back and front office is available on an hourly and daily basis.

Immigration procedures and requirements vary greatly from country to country. Documents requested from applicants depend on the citizenship of the individual applying and the status he wishes to obtain in the destination country, be it authorisation to work, authorisation for accompanying family members, tourist or study visas, temporary or permanent residency status.

 

Passport immigration stamp

• HTLC Network has been selected by many International Law and Immigration Firms as well as Global Relocation Companies to represent them exclusively for immigration

• We work closely with the relevant governmental and police authorities in each country

• Our Immigration Team are experts in immigration laws and keep abreast of changing requirements and procedures

• We prepare all documentation for HR, all you have to do is print out and sign

• We inform the Transferee which specific documents are required , which translations must be obtained and if these must be legalised

• We provide HR and Transferees with information on the process flow, timing and specific legal requirements of each destination

• We update all parties involved regularly as to the status of the application

• Whenever possible, we act with a Power of Attorney on behalf of the company and the Transferee; when the Transferee’s presence is required, he will be accompanied to the relevant office in the destination city

• Our Local Counsellors, residents and locals of the destination city, are able to present the all prepared documentation to the relevant offices in person; thus speeding up the process and ensuring an efficient service

 

For more info about our immigration services in Turkey please contact our marketing department at: info@htlcnetwork.com

dubaiDubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates, located within the emirate. The emirate of Dubai is located on the southeast coast of the Persian Gulf and is one of the seven emirates that make up the country. It has the largest population in the UAE and the second-largest land territory by area after Abu Dhabi, the national capital.

Dubai and Abu Dhabi are the only two emirates to have veto power over critical matters of national importance in the country’s legislature.

Today, Dubai has emerged as a cosmopolitan metropolis that has grown steadily to become a global city and a business and cultural hub of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf region. It is also a major transport hub for passengers and cargo.

UAE FAQ - Housing
What can I expect to find in an unfurnished, a semi-furnished or a furnished property?

Unfurnished properties: Fitted kitchen is common (usually white goods)
Semi-furnished property: Very rare
Fully furnished property: The style is arab.

What sort of flexibility will I have to negotiate rent or furnishings?

As with all other real estate, everything is negotiable, and the outcome depends on the negotiator’s skills and of the fact that is a very fast moving market.

How many properties will I be shown?

This depends on the Relocation Package you have selected: HTLC Network Basic Package includes 8 properties and the Extended Package includes 15 properties. You will be told at the outset how many properties you will be shown or how much time you have available to do the house hunting. The properties provided will be as close to your ‘Needs Analysis’ description as possible according to what is available on the market at the time.

How can I secure a property that I choose?

A non refundable holding deposit of 5% of the annual rent will be expected to be paid to protect your property and remove it from the market. On signing a tenancy agreement this 5% payment becomes your refundable security deposit which is held by the landlord and retuned at the end of the term dependant on the condition of the property.

What costs are involved in renting a property?

– A deposit is always mandatory.
– The security deposit is hold by the landlord, who returns it when receiving the home keys back (after the inspection of the unit).
The deposit amount depends on the property: 5% of the annual rental value for an apartment, 10% of the annual rent for a villa (by law).
A receipt must be issued by the landlord and the deposit paid must be mentioned in the tenancy agreement.

The landlord shall return the security deposit to the tenant within 15 days after the tenant vacates, unless the landlord has a claim for all or a portion of the security deposit.

What other expenses should I expect to pay?

The Real Estate Regulatory Agency (RERA) of Land Department has made it mandatory for all rental contracts to be registered The Real Estate Regulatory Agency (RERA) of Land Department has made it mandatory for all rental contracts to be registered.

Rental contracts can be registered by either the landlord or the tenant Lease contract form to be filled in with your passport, ID & visa number. The real estate agent usually ends his/her job once the contract has been signed and he/she receives the agency fees ( by law, 5% of the contract).

The insurance is not mandatory for the home (only for the entire building).
The tenant can (not mandatory) issue a home insurance.

The landlord is responsible for paying any services fees relating to a property however as a tenant you are responsible to pay a municipality tax of 5% of the annual rent which is shown separately on the electricity bill. You may be required to pay a contribution of the air conditioning fees if the property is not set up to meter each unit individually. In this case the charges are normally made by the developer and not the utility provider.

What is the process flow to rent a property?

The landlord is responsible for paying any services fees relating to a property however as a tenant you are responsible to pay a municipality tax of 5% of the annual rent which is shown separately on the electricity bill. You may be required to pay a contribution of the air conditioning fees if the property is not set up to meter each unit individually. In this case the charges are normally made by the developer and not the utility provider.

What chance do I have of receiving my full deposit back when I leave the property?

There is no document or clause that can guarantee the fact that you’ll receive the money back at the end of the lease agreement.

What responsibility do I have as a tenant towards maintenance of the property?

Generally outdoor maintenance (paintwork, railings etc.) is the responsibility of the landlord. Indoor maintenance of a general nature is the
responsibility of the tenant. At the end of the lease the property must be returned in the same conditions as when he/she moved in. Therefore usually is the tenant and not the landlord who takes care of the general cleaning. Professional cleaning is available and cost is (average) 8 US$ per hour.

Can I make any alterations to the property?

Only with written permission from the landlord.

In case alterations have been made to improve the property without the written permission of the landlord, the landlord has the right not to
reimburse any expenses the tenant has had in relation to the work. In cases where the landlord does not approve o the changes made, he/she has the right to require the tenant to put the property back into its original condition.

What if I need to terminate the lease early?

Tenancy contracts are standardized in a form- hey can be customized but the term for tenant-only break must be discussed and agreed by the landlord before the signature.

It’s very difficult though to find a landlord who accepts the breakclause (without notice), as the market demand is pretty high. What can be negotiated with the landlord is the notice period and the penalty clause in case of breaking the contract without notice.

By law, the notice period is 60 days.
It’s very common to find 3 months notice period in tenancy contracts, but this term can be negotiated.

UAE FAQ - Utilities
What utility expenses will I have to pay?

Water, Gas ( available only bottled ), Telephone.

There are no garbage taxes.
Note: only a resident can rent a property and therefore the assignee needs to have a valid resident visa attached to his/her passport.

Will I be able to get Satellite TV?

Yes.

What documents do I need to install a Telephone Line?

Etisalat: Passport + copy and valid residence Visa+copy
DU: Copy of the tenancy agreement or proof of ownership, Passport copy with visa page, Application form signed by the person named
on the tenancy contract/proof of ownership.

note: To get a fixed phone line, the subscriber must be resident in Dubai. It is not possible to get a connection online

How long will I have to wait for my telephone?

After filing the application, a person receives an appointment for an Etisalat technician to visit and install connection within 3 (three)
working days.

How will I be billed?

Bills will arrive monthly.

What about Internet connection?

You can have the connection through the normal phone line or with the ADSL line.

UAE FAQ - Safety
Is it advisable to have 24-hour guard service?

No.

Are there any precautions a foreigner must take?

Nothing in particular except the common sense.

UAE FAQ - Driving
Are any foreign licenses valid or do all foreigners have to possess an International License?

Following citizens can drive with their own driving license on a tourist visa (30days), without the need of an international driving license:

Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Kuwait, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States. All other nationalities need an international driving license.
On a tourist visa one person can only drive rented cars.

Do all foreigners require an International Driving Licence?

All residents must have their local license.
If not a citizen for the above mentioned countries (or without a license) the person must undergo a training.

For how long can I drive my own car in UAE?

Until you are on a tourist Visa you can drive for 30 days, then, when you become resident, you must have a valid UAE driving license.

Can i buy a car?

Yes.

UAE FAQ - Health
Do I have to be vaccinated before arriving to UAE?

No.

What Health Care facilities are available?

Both private and public sectors are available for foreigners, but in both cases treatments are to be paid.
Therefore it’s usual to use the private structures listed by the health insurance.

UAE FAQ - About HTLC Network
Why should I choose HTLC Network?

– Extensive rapidly growing client list.
– Exclusive partner/representative of many Global Relocation Service Providers.
– Exclusive representative of many International Law and Immigration Firms.
– Quality control guarantee: Head Office directs all relocations and immigrations in every destination.
– All staff required to attend on-going training sessions and workshops to keep updated as to global mobility needs.
– No language barriers – Assistance provided in all major European languages and many others.
– Corporate consultation with HTLC Network’s’ Representatives at location of choice.
– HTLC Network own ‘Resource Guides’ providing a wealth of everyday information for expatlife in destination city.
– Comprehensive FAQs for each country serviced.
– Red Alert List to prepare for the specific challenges of each destination.
– Extra ‘Safety’ section in Resource Guides for countries posing specific security threats.
– 24-hour Emergency Helpline for Transferees throughout the duration of the relocation.
– Complimentary 3-month Helpline.

UAE FAW - For corporate
How does HTLC Network assist with Immigration?

HTLC Network will prepare all the necessary paperwork, email it to the Company and direct as to how the various documents are to be printed out and signed. We will send one of our Local Counsellors with Power of Attorney  to act on behalf of the individual and company.

When the Transferee has to be present to apply for a document, he will be accompanied by our Local Counsellor.

What time scale should be allowed to process Work Permit applications?

When all paper work has been prepared, approved and signed by the relevant companies, it can take 6-8 weeks during which time Italian law states that the expatriate must not be in Italy.

How can we determine a realistic Housing Budget for Transferees?

During HTLC Network’ initial teleconference with the client we go through an in-depth ‘Needs Analysis’ which can include Housing Budget variables for the Destination City. HTLC Network will work with the Company to ensure the workforce locate properties of a suitable standard within the parameters set by corporate policy.

Can the contract be signed in the name of a foreign company?

Legally, yes, as long as it can be proved that the individual who signs the contract has the legal right to sign as a representative of the Company. Many landlords however, will not accept this as it is harder to take a foreign Company to court should there be any missing rent payments or problems. As landlord’s rarely accept a foreign Company signing the lease, it is usually signed by the local company that is VAT registered locally.

HTLC Network will prepare the contract in the name of a legal representative of the Company. We require full data of the individual, a photocopy of his/her passport ID pages and a photocopy of the Company’ s document demonstrating position within the Company.

The prepared contract will be emailed to the appropriate Company contact and instructions will be given on how it is to be printed out and signed. Once signed, one of HTLC Network’ Local Counsellors will collect the contract and deliver it to the real estate agent for the signature of the landlord. A signed copy will be returned to the Company whilst the three copies of the contract are being registered, thereafter a registered copy will be delivered.

Arrangements will be made to take a thorough inventory in the presence of the tenant and landlord.

Is it necessary for the Transferee to be present to apply for documents?

For the presentation of document application, it varies from city to city. Wherever possible HTLC Network will prepare power of attorney  in order for a Local Counsellor to act on behalf of the Transferee and family.

To release the obtained documents, the Transferee and other members of the family must be present as an original signature is required.

How can we guarantee all Transferees will receive the same standard of service? (staff relocating to main cities versus more rural areas)

All Local Counsellors are really ‘local’ to the area where they assist Transferees. They are selected for their good knowledge of their city area.

All Local Counsellors are trained by HTLC Network to follow our set pattern of delivering services using an in-house ‘Training and Operations Manual’.

All Local Counsellors are closely directed by Office Coordinators, ensuring a consistent standard of service is delivered.

How does HTLC Network handle Group Moves?

All relocations are handled by the same system of centralisation. When required, we arrange for a member of our office team to go to the location of a group move to be an in-house Coordinator, working from the Client Company’s premises as a point of reference for HR, Transferees and their families.

In main centres we have several Local Counsellors.

What ongoing support is provided for Transferees and families?

HTLC Network aims to equip your workforce to settle into their new environment as soon as possible. Upon arrival they are presented with a local Information Pack. They are given access to our on-line City Specific Resource Guides that provide general local information as well as specific local information once a suitable property has been located.

We have a 24hour emergency helpline throughout the duration of the relocation. We provide a 90 day complimentary phone line that can be extended throughout the duration of the assignment.

Our aim is to teach the Transferee how to live in his new city and to equip him to be as independent as possible.

Geography

Area: 83,600 sq km
Time Zone: UTC/GMT +4 hours
Capital city: Abu Dhabi
Bordering countries: Oman, Saudi Arabia
Climate: desert; cooler in eastern mountains

Government

Stateform: Federation with specified powers delegated to the UAE federal government and other powers reserved to member emirates
Legislative Branch: Unicameral Federal National Council (FNC) or Majlis al-Ittihad al-Watani
National Holiday: Independence Day, 2 December (1971)
Currency: Emirati dirham (AED)

Population

Population: Approximately 5,473,972 (July 2013 est.) inhabitants
Religion: Muslim (Islam – official) 96% (Shia 16%), other (includes Christian, Hindu) 4%
Languages: Arabic (official), Persian, English, Hindi, Urdu
Ethnic groups: Emirati 19%, other Arab and Iranian 23%, South Asian 50%, other expatriates (includes Westerners and East Asians) 8%